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self-avoiding walk

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Published by Birkhäuser in Boston .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Self-avoiding walks (Mathematics),
  • Statistical physics.,
  • Chemistry, Physical and theoretical -- Mathematics.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 399-416) and index.

StatementNeal Madras, Gordon Slade.
SeriesProbability and its applications
ContributionsSlade, Gordon Douglas, 1955-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsQA274.73 .M33 1993
The Physical Object
Paginationxiv, 425 p. :
Number of Pages425
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1724585M
ISBN 100817635890
LC Control Number92028276

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About this book. A self-avoiding walk is a path on a lattice that does not visit the same site more than once. In spite of this simple definition, many of the most basic questions about this model are difficult to resolve in a mathematically rigorous fashion. In particular, we do not know much about how far an n­ step self-avoiding walk typically travels from its starting point, or even how many such walks there are. Introduction. The self-avoiding walk is a mathematical model that has important applications in statistical mechanics and polymer science. In spite of its simple definition—a path on a lattice that does not visit the same site more than once—it is difficult to analyze mathematically. The Self-Avoiding Walk provides the first unified account of the known rigorous results for the self-avoiding walk, . A second goal of this book is to discuss some of the applications of the self-avoiding walk in physics and chemistry, and to describe some of the nonrigorous methods used in those fields. The model originated in chem­ istry several decades ago as a model for long-chain polymer molecules. springer, The self-avoiding walk is a mathematical model that has important applications in statistical mechanics and polymer science. In spite of its simple definition—a path on a lattice that does not visit the same site more than once—it is difficult to analyze mathematically.

- Bulletin of Mathematics Books The self-avoiding walk is a mathematical model that has important applications in statistical mechanics and polymer science. In spite of its simple definition - a 4/5(2). The Self-Avoiding Walk quantity. Add to cart. Add to wishlist. the self-avoiding walk, the main definitions about stochastic processes and conver-gence that will be needed to analyze the scaling limit of the SAW as well as the main critical exponents and the connective constant. i. Chapter 2 presents the conjectured scaling limit for the self-avoiding walk in di-. The Self-Avoiding Walk: A Brief Survey Gordon Sladey Abstract. Simple random walk is well understood. However, if we condition a random walk not to intersect itself, so that it is a self-avoiding walk, then it is much more di cult to analyse and many of .

Self-avoiding walk. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jump to navigation Jump to search. A sequence of moves on a lattice that does not visit the same point more than once. In mathematics, a self-avoiding walk (SAW) is a sequence of moves on a lattice (a lattice path) that does not visit the same point more than once. This is a special case of the graph theoretical notion of a path. The self-avoiding walk is a mathematical model that has important applications in statistical mechanics and polymer science. In spite of its simple definition—a path on a lattice that does not visit the same site more than once—it is difficult to analyze mathematically.   "The Self-Avoiding Walk is a reprint of the original edition and is part of the Modern Birkhäuser Classics series. It provides numerous theorems and their proofs. A second goal of this book is to discuss some of the applications of the self-avoiding walk in physics and chemistry, and to describe some of the nonrigorous methods used in those fields. The model originated in chem istry several decades ago as a model for long-chain polymer molecules.